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PORTLAND FIRE STATIONS THROUGH HISTORY

(1853 TO PRESENT)

(revised February 29, 2024)

To find the station you want to learn about, first determine the quadrant of Portland where it is located.  The map on the MAP OF ALL STATIONS page can help you locate a specifc station.  Once you determine the quadrant, click on the button below to take you to all station history in that quadrant.  Stations are first listed alphabetically by street name, then in numerial order by street number.  Active stations are shown in YELLOW.

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Following the path of Portland Fire Station history is challenging.   Each fire station has a story, but it does not necessarily follow the Company number assigned to a fire engine or fire truck (e.g. Engine 1, Truck 1).  

Two documents have been created here.  The first shares the history of Engine and Truck Company assignments based on the address of the individual fire station.  It is organized by:

  • Quadrant

  • Street Name Alphabetical

  • Street Name Numerical

The second document shares the story of each fire station, accompanied by photos, in the chronological order in which each address was established.  Many of the addresses played host to several different buildings on the same site.  Learn for yourself the rich history of Portland's firehouses. 

The Legacy of Lee Holden

Chief Lee Holden would prove to be an important and unlikely designer of Portland Fire Stations.  Under his guidance, 25 Portland Fire Stations would be created, most remining in service or in functional private ownership for over 100 years.  And his influence would be even more.  Read about his career and contributions here.  

Actual Portland Fire Station Tours

This web site allows you to take a virtual tour of Portland Fire Stations (below).  But if you're inclined to want to take an actual driving tour of the city of Portland and visit the active and inactive fire stations that still stand in Portland, this is the place for you.

Below you will find 6 documents, each representing a quadrant of the City, taking you on a stop by stop tour of Portland fire stations.  The address is provided to enter into a GPS.  When you arrive, the narrative is provided to share information about the stop.  

These are provided in printable documents so you can have it in hand, or read it from your device.  Enjoy, and drive safe!

North Portland

NORTH PORTLAND

8615 N Albany Street Municipal Terminal #3 (Houseboat)

Fireboat 3 - 1928 to 1962

Located on N. Albany Street, which forms a loop at the end of N. Pittsburg Avenue along the east bank of the Willamette River, Fireboat 3 resided in a houseboat that served as their fire station.  Being a floating fire station, they carried no land-based response capabilities.  Fireboat 3 would be named the "Karl Gunster."  He died on June 15, 1921 at the May Apartment Fire in downtown Portland.  The floating firehouse would be moved in 1962, closer to downtown Portland.  This fire station no longer exists.

Fireboat Gunster at Fireboat Station fro
Gunster middle is Robert Young Jr and Sr

7205 N Alta Avenue

ENGINE 22, TRUCK 22 IN SERVICE

Engine 22 - 1960 to Present

Truck 22 - 1984 to Present

Truck 9 - 1960 to 1984

Engine 32 - 1954 to 1960

Located on N. Alta Avenue between N. Ivanhoe and Syracuse Streets, Station 22 would be built in 1954 to provide proper quarters for Engine 32, which was housed in the basement of the building on N. Philadelphia Avenue.  Engine 32 would serve the St. Johns community until 1960.  The Modernization Program would relocate and redistribute stations across the city, resulting in the renumbering of Engine 32 to Engine 22.  At the same time in 1960, Truck 9 would be co-located with Engine 22.  Truck 9 would again be renamed in 1984 when Portland entered into a consolidation agreement with Multnomah County Fire District 10 (all truck companies would be matched, numerically, to the engine company with which they served).  Station 22 was beloved by the St. Johns community.  After the tragic death of a young girl named Shirlee Ann Howell, the community rallied to purchase a rescue vehicle to provide quicker response to St. Johns.  It would affectionately named the "Shirlee Ann" and would serve for many years.  It was removed by Portland Fire in the late 1990's.  This station remains in service today. 

Station 22.jpg
Shirlee Ann Rescue and crew.jpg
Sta 22, 7205 N Alta St.jpg

2600 Block of N Borthwick Avenue

Engine 8 - 1891 to 1903

Truck 5 - 1891 to 1892

Located on N Borthwick between N Russell and Knott Streets, Engine 8 began service in North Portland in 1891.  While it isn't known for sure, this may have been a station (or just the property) that came to Portland when Albina was annexed into the city.  Truck 5 would accompany Engine 8 for one year then Truck 5 would be relocated.  Engine 8 would be moved to new quarters on NE Russell Street in 1903 and this building would not be used again.  The building no longer exists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engine 8 and unk Truck with crew.jpg
compressed Truck 8 in front of building.

8105 N Brandon Avenue

(1711 Brandon Street)

Engine 8 - 1960 to 1960

Engine 30 - 1913 to 1960

Located on N. Brandon Avenue, between Kilpatrick and Schofield Streets, Station 30 would be built in 1913.  This was one of the Lee Holden designed Two Story fire stations.  It was built through a joint venture between the city of Portland and Swift Packing Company. The land was donated by the Kenwood Development Corp, and the construction was paid for by the city.  In 1960, it was first renumbered as Engine 8 as part of the Modernization Program, then closed by the end of 1960.  Engine 8 would open on N Maryland Street.  The Kenton Firehouse became a storage facility for city surplus for 17 years before being sold.  It was cleaned up and refurbished to become the Historic Kenton Firehouse and designated an historic landmark.  It provides a place for a variety of community events today and remains a part of the community.

Station 30 Hose 30 and crew outside.jpg
2008 July Station 30 old.JPG

5340 N Interstate Avenue

(1126 Patton Avenue)

Engine 24 - 1911 to 1959

Truck 7 - 1928 to 1959

Located on N. Interstate Avenue between Emerson Street and Willamette Boulevard, Station 24 was built in 1911.  It is believed to be one of Lee Holden's designs (two stations other than the Bungalows and Two Story's were designed by Chief Holden).  Much like Station 25, it was grand in size and design and may have been built as a headquarters for the north end of Portland.  In 1927, Truck 7 would join Engine 24 and they would both remain until 1959 when the Modernization Program would provide a new station on N. Maryland Street.  Training would also take place in this building.  The building remains in existence today, having been used by the City of Portland for various programs and activities.

1911 Station 24 and crew.jpg
Truck 7 App 21 1951 Seagrave.bmp

12070 N Jantzen Beach Avenue

Engine 17 - 1973 to 1995

Boat 17 - 1994 to 1995

Located on Hayden Island on N. Jantzen Beach Avenue and Hayden Island Drive, Station 17 was provided by a local business that was a land developer for Hayden Island.  Engine 17 would move occupy the building in 1973, leaving its temporary quarters at Station 3 on NW Johnson Street.  In 1994, Fireboat 17 would be located at a nearby moorage.  The following year, the new Station 17 would be completed on N. Tomahawk Island Drive, closer to the moorage.  The old building would be turned back to the owners and eventually be torn down for other development.  It no longer exists.   

5247 N Lombard Street

ENGINE 26

Engine 26 -1959 to Present

Engine 36 - 1928 to 1959

Located on N. Lombard Street between N. Hereford and Gloucester, Station 36 was built in 1928.  It was a Bungalow design, created by Chief Lee Holden.  It would be occupied by Engine 36 from 1928 until 1959 when the Modernization Program would relocated and redistribute fire stations across the city.  It would remain, but Engine 36 would be renamed Engine 26, which also changed the designation of the fire station to Station 26.  While it has undergone several remodels over the years, the station remains in existence and in service for Portland Fire today.  A seismic and functional renovation took place in the early 2000's. 

B2, Sta 17, 12070 N Jantzen Ave.jpg
compressed 1930 c_Engine 36 outside stai
2008 July Station 26.JPG

4515 N Maryland Avenue

ENGINE 24

Engine 24 - 1959 to Present

Truck 24 - 1984 to 1987

Truck 7 - 1959 to 1984

Located on N. Maryland Avenue between NE Prescott and Going Streets, Station 24 would be built in 1959 as part of the Modernization Program that would add and move many fire stations across the city.  Engine 24 and Truck 7 would be co-located there, with both the Engine and Truck moving from their N. Interstate location.  Truck 7 would be renamed Truck 24 in 1984 when the consolidation with Fire District 10 would occur.  At that time, all Truck companies were renamed to match the Engine with which they were co-located.  Truck 7 would move to Station 8 in 1987.  Key to their service area is quick access to both Swan Island and also Interstate 5.  This station remains in service today.

A1, Sta 24, 4515 N  Maryland Ave.jpg
A3, Sta 24, 4515 N. Maryland Ave.jpg

7134 N Maryland Avenue

ENGINE 8, TRUCK 8

Engine 8 - 1960 to 2013

Truck 8 - 1987 to Present

Located on N. Maryland Avenue between N. Buffalo and Bryant Streets, Station 8 would be created in 1960 as part of the Modernization Program that created or moved fire stations across the city.  Engine 8 would move from their previous location on N. Brandon Avenue.  Truck 8 would join Engine 8, having been previously Truck 24.  Key to their service area is proximity to Interstate 5.  Both companies continue to serve at this location today.  This station remains in service. 

4015 N Mississippi Avenue

(829 Mississippi Street)

Engine 33 - 1913 to 1921

Chemical 3 - 1912 to 1912

Chemical 4 - 1908 to 1911

Located on N. Mississippi Avenue Between Shaver and Mason Streets, This station may have been built in 1891 but was occupied by Portland Fire in 1908.  It would initially house Chemical #4 until 1911 then Chemical #3 from 1912 to 1913.  In 1913, Engine 33 would be assigned and remain until 1921.  Engine 33 would move to Linnton at that time.  This station no longer exists. 

B2, Sta 8, 7134 N Maryland Ave.jpg
4015 N Mississippi Avenue 1908 to 1921.j

11040 N Lombard Street Municipal Terminal #4 Pier 2 (Houseboat)

Boat 3 - 1965 to 1985

11040 N Lombard Street Municipal Terminal #4 Pier 4 (Houseboat)

Boat 3 - 1962 to 1965

Fireboat 3, the "Jenkins," moored at the houseboat when located at Terminal 4, Pier 4 - 1962-1965

Floating in the Willamette River, the quarters for Fireboat 3 would exist at Terminal 4, Pier 4 from 1962 to 1965.  Prior to 1962, the houseboat had been placed at Terminal 3, accessed from N. Albany Street in St. Johns.  It would be moved again in 1965 to Pier 2 at Terminal 4.  In 1985, the houseboat would be decommissioned and be sold from service.  It no longer exists today. 

A1, Jenkins.jpg
Fireboat Spencer at Fireboat Station.jpg

7214 N Philadelphia Avenue

(215 Philadelphia Street)

Engine 32 - 1913 to 1954

Located in St. Johns in a triangle bordered by N. Philadelphia, Burlington, and Syracuse, Station 32 remains in existence, but is unidentifiable to those who do not know.  When St. Johns was annexed into the city, it needed both a Police and Fire Station.  In 1913, the former St. Johns city hall was converted to North Precinct on the upper floors for the Police Bureau, and Station 32 in the basement.  This would continue until 1954 when the new station on N. Alta would be built.  The building remains today but its life as a fire station is indistinguishable. 

Station 32 exterior.tif
Engine 32 App 42 1929 ALF.jpg

922 N River Street

(Foot of N Albina Street)

Boat 2 - 1923 to 1960

Located on N. River Road on the east bank of the Willamette River at the corner of Albina Avenue, this station was specially built for housing Fireboat 2, the David Campbell.  It would move from across the river at the foot of NW Hoyt Street.  It would remain at this location until 1960, then move back across the river to NW Front Avenue after the Modernization Program would produce a new fire station and fireboat facility.  Along with Fireboat 2, the station would house a Boat Tender that would transport fire hose to and from fire scenes.  This station remains in existence today, however access is limited and it is difficult to see from surrounding streets.

Fireboat Station 2.jpg
A4, Campbell at Ft of  N. Albina in May

Swan Island (owned by Maritime Commission)

Engine 38 - 1942 to 1947

During World War II when the Swan Island shipyards were working round the clock to build and repair naval ships, fire protection became an issue.  A fire station was located on Swan Island to better serve the operations.  It is believed it was largely funded by the military and perhaps operated more like a fire brigade, with assistance from Portland Fire, but little is in the record about it.  No photos exist of the station. 

848 N Tomahawk Island Drive

ENGINE 17, FIREBOAT 17

Engine 17 - 1995 to Present

Boat 17 - 1995 to Present

Located on N Tomahawk Island Drive at the intersection with N Jantzen Beach Avenue, Station 17 was built in 1995 and houses both Engine 17 and Fireboat 17.  It would replace the station located on  N Jantzen Beach Avenue.  While only a few blocks away, it was an improved location due to the proximity to the fireboat dock.  The station remains in service today. 

2008 July Station 17.JPG
2008 July Fireboat Buss.JPG

3800 Block N Vancouver Avenue (Between Beech and Failing Street)

Hose 4 - 1892 to 1893

Located on N Vancouver Avenue between Beech and Failing Streets, Hose 4 was a standalone company that may have been part of the Albina annexation.  Hose companies were typically paired with an engine company during the horse drawn days but some existed in stations by themselves due to space limitations.  Hose Companies carried ladders, hose, and equipment that would otherwise make steam engines heavier than horses could handle.  This station would cease to be used in 1893 and the crew was likely blended into other stations.  The building no longer exists.  No photos of this station are known to exist.

East & Northeast Portlnd

EAST & NORTHEAST PORTLAND

7301 E Burnside Street

ENGINE 19

Engine 19 - 1953 to Present

Squad 19 - 1984 to 1984

Truck 19 - 1984 to 1984

Truck 6 - 1963 to 1984

Located on East Burnside Street between 73rd and 74th Avenue, Station 19 opened in 1953, replacing the old Station 19 on SE Stark Street.  Engine 19 would serve alone for ten year before Truck 6 would move from Station 9 on SE Belmont to join it.  Two other stations would share similar architecture, Station 13 and 22, both built within a year of Station 19.  In 1984, with the consolidation of Fire District 10 and Portland, Truck 6 would become Truck 19, but go out of service later that year.  It was replaced with Squad 19, a staffing unit that was to respond to incidents across East Portland to supplement staffing when needed.  This two would live a short life.  The concept would be mothballed in late 1984 with Engine 19 continuing alone through today.  The station remains in existence and in service. 

1954 June Station 19 Engine 19 1954 Seag
B2, Sta 19, 7301 E Burnside.jpg

7210 NE Alderwood Road

Engine 12 - 1980 to 1988

Located on NE Alderwood Road near the corner of NE 82nd Avenue, Station 12 was built in 1980.  Located in close proximity to Portland International Airport, Engine 12 would be available to cover the response area in that part of Portland, and also assist the Port of Portland Fire Department with incidents near and at the airport.  For part of its service, the station was equipped with a specialized airport crash fire apparatus.  The station itself was equipped with heavy insulation and special glass to deaden the noise associated created by air traffic.  Engine 12 had been mothballed since 1965, having closed at the Bungalow station on NE 24th Avenue.  It would close at this location in 1988 and Engine 12 would be mothballed for another 15 years (2003) before re-surfacing at its present day location on NE Sandy Boulevard.  The station was sold and served a variety of private businesses.  The building still exists today.

B5, Sta 12, 7210 NE Alderwood Rd.jpg

6823 NE Durham Avenue

(426 Durham Avenue)

Engine 29 - 1913 to 1957

Located on NE Durham Avenue, between NE Dekum and Liberty Streets, Station 29 was built in 1913.  This building was a Lee Holden designed Two Story fire station.  In 1957, Engine 29 was put out of service until the Modernization Program produced a new station on the banks of the Willamette River at the foot of SE Madison Street.  This station opened in 1960.  This building was sold into private ownership.  For a time, it was the residence of a Portland Firefighter.  It would later be sold to become a restaurant and serve other private business purposes.  The building remains in existence today. 

Station 29 Hose 29 and crew.jpg
2008 July Station 29 old.JPG

5916 NE Going Street

Toy & Joy Warehouse - 2006 to Present

Engine 40 - 1984 to 2005

Truck 40 - 1984 to 1993

Truck 8 - 1984 to 1984

District #10 Prior to 1984

Located on NE Going Street near the corner of NE 60th Avenue, Station 40 would be inherited from Fire District 10.  Station 40 was relatively close to Station 28 on NE Sandy Boulevard.  It was decided that Engine 28 should be closed and the older Two Story Station 28 be given to the City.  Station 40 would put Engine 40 and Truck 8 (moved to this location from SW DeWitt Street, where it was co-located with Engine 5) into service in 1984.  The Truck was immediately renumbered to Truck 40.  Truck 40 would be taken out of service in 1993.  In 2005, Engine 40 would be moved to the re-purchased Station 28 on NE Sandy Boulevard and be renamed Engine 28.  Station 40 would be turned over to the Toy & Joy Program to become their storage and distribution headquarters.  Toy & Joy began providing toys for Portland Children in 1914 and remains in operation today.  The building remains in existence.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

A1, Sta 40, 5916 NE Going St.jpg

1207 NE Grand Avenue

(261 Grand Avenue)

Engine 13 - 1908 to 1955

Located on NE Grand Avenue at Multnomah Street, Engine 13 would be established in 1908.  It would remain at this site until the new Station 13 would be built on NE Weidler Street.  This building no longer exists. 

Engine 13 and Hose 13 horse drawn.jpg
A1, Sta 13, 1207 NE Grand Ave.jpg

420 NE Holladay Street

(390 Holladay Street)

Truck 4 - 1895 to 1906

Located on NE Holladay Street between MLK Jr. Boulevard (Union Avenue) and Grand Avenue, Truck 4 originated as a lone Truck Company.  It would remain in this status from 1895 to 1906.  Truck 4 would be moved to quarters with Engine 7 in 1906 at SE 3rd Avenue.  This station then ceased to be used and the building no longer exists.    

Truck 4 @ 390 Holladay.tif

1905 NE Killingsworth Street

ENGINE 14

Engine 14 - 1959 to Present

Located on NE Killingsworth Street at the corner of NE 19th Avenue, Station 14 occupies the southwest corner of the block that is occupied by Alberta Park.  Engine 14 would move to this station in 1959 when it was built to replace the previous Station 14 which was on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (Union Avenue).  This move would be made possible by the Modernization Program that added and moved fire stations across the city.  Engine 14 has occupied this station as a lone company every since.  The building remains in service today. 

A4, Sta 14, 1905 NE Killingsworth St.jpg
A7, Sta 14, 1905 NE Killingsworth St.jpg

45 NE Russell Street

(303 Russell Street)

Engine 8 - 1903 to 1957

Truck 5 - 1927 to 1955

Truck 5 - 1907 to 1917

Located on NE Russell Street, between NE Rodney and Williams Avenue, Engine 8 would begin service at this location in 1903.  They had previously been housed on N. Borthwick Avenue.  This building may have existed prior to 1903 and been a part of the Albina Volunteer Fire Department.  Albina would be annexed into the City of Portland in 1891, bringing fire protection and other city services to the area.  Truck 5 would be assigned to the same location in 1907.  Truck 5 would be moved in 1917, but return in 1927.  The station would remain in service until 1957 when the Modernization Program would build new stations.  This would eventually move Engine 8 and Truck 5 to N. Maryland Avenue where they remain today.  This building no longer exists.

Engine 8 and Hose 8 in front of station
45 NE Russell Trk 2, App 22, 1916 ALF 85

5540 NE Sandy Boulevard

(1494 Sandy Boulevard)

ENGINE 28

Engine 28 - 2005 to Present

Engine 28 - 1913 to 1984

Located on NE Sandy Boulevard, between NE 54th and 56th Avenues, Station 28 was built in 1913.  It was of the Lee Holden designed Two Story fire stations.  It would go on to serve a long and interesting service life.  In 1984, the building would be vacated when Multnomah County Fire District #10 was consolidated with Portland Fire.  District 10's Station 40, located at 59th and NE Going Street, was near enough that two stations were not necessary for the area.  Station 28 was sold and a few years later, given to the Portland Office of Neighborhood Associations.  Portland Fire would pass a bond measure to rebuild and relocate fire stations in the early 2000's.  Station 40 was no longer deemed suitable so Portland Fire "purchased" old Station 28 back from the city and renovated it into a modern day fire station.  It would resume service in 2005 and remain in service today.  The artwork in front of it was part of the mandatory 1% of station cost that was required to invest in artistic pieces for public properties. 

Station 28 side view.jpg
2008 July Station 28 New.JPG

8645 NE Sandy Boulevard

ENGINE 12

Engine 12 - 2003 to Present

Located on NE Sandy Boulevard at the corner of NE 87th Avenue, Station 12 was built as part of the General Obligation Bond project that would seismically upgrade or replace stations across the city of Portland.  It would open its doors in 2003.  The number 12 had been mothballed since 1988 when the 8 year old station 12 on NE Alderwood was closed.  The station remains in service today.

2008 July Station 12 new.JPG

13313 NE San Rafael Street

ENGINE 30

Engine 30 - 2007 to Present

Engine 43 - 1984 to 2007

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on NE San Rafael Street between NE 133rd and 134th Avenues, Station 43 was inherited from Fire District 10 when the consolidation with Portland Fire occurred.  It would house Engine 43 in 1984 but it would be changed to Engine 30 in 2006 when renumbering took place to fill in the blanks in Portland’s numbering system.  The station remains in service today. No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

2006 May Station 43.JPG
2008 July Station 30 new.JPG

1019 NE MLK Boulevard

(227 N Union Avenue)

Chemical 3 - 1894 to 1907

Located on what was then Union Avenue between Hassalo and Holladay Streets, Chemical Company #3 would begin service in 1894 and remain at this location until 1907, then moved to N. Mississippi Avenue.  Chemical engines, unlike steamers, used chemicals to propel water from a tank through hoses.  This station would cease being used in 1907 and the building no longer exists.

Chem 3 at 227 Union Ave.jpg

4867 NE MLK Boulevard 

(1027 N Union Avenue)

Engine 14 - 1924 to 1959

Engine 14 - 1908 to 1924

Chemical 4 - 1898 to 1907

Located on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (formerly Union Avenue) between Alberta and Wygant Streets, this station began in 1898 as a wooden building that housed Chemical Engine 4 until 1907.  After a brief vacancy, Engine 14 would be assigned to the building.  In 1924, the original station was razed and a Bungalow station would be built in its place.  This was one of the 25 Lee Holden designed stations.   A new station would be built on NE Killingsworth in 1959 and this building would be vacated for good.  It would serve several private business but was finally razed some years later.  The building no longer exists.    

Station 14 Engine 14 and Hose 14 with cr
Station 14.jpg

926 NE Weidler Street

ENGINE 13, TRUCK 13

Engine 13 - 1955 to Present

Truck 13 - 1984 to Present

Truck 5 - 1955 to 1984

Located on NE Weidler Street between NE 9th and 10th Avenue, Station 13 was built in 1955.  Sharing design cues with Stations 19 and 22, it would move from the Grand Avenue site to serve the heart of the Lloyd District.  Truck 5 would be co-located with Engine 13.  In 1984, with the consolidation of Portland and District 10, Truck 5 would become Truck 13 (all truck companies would be renamed to match the engine company with which they were housed).  The station remains in service today.  

Engine 13 App 64 1938 Fageol.jpg
2008 July Station 13.JPG

2200 NE 24th Avenue

Engine 12 - 1957 to 1965

Engine 18 - 1939 to 1941

Engine 18 - 1913 to 1933

Located on NE 24th Avenue between NE Thompson and Tillamook Streets, this station would carry two different identities over its service life.  Built in 1913, it was the first Bungalow station to be built..  The Bunglow was designed by Chief Lee Holden.  It was envisioned when a neighborhood like Irvington needed a fire station but the asthetic of a commercial building, like the Two Story fire stations that Holden designed, was not really suitable to the community.  The Bungalow was much  more house-like in design.  The apparatus doors were disguised by a facade, complete with flower boxes, that didn't let on that it opened to an apparatus bay.  The hose tower, a normally prominent feature of a fire station, would terminate at the top in a dormer and extend into a pit in the basement, all in order to conceal the feature.  The Bungalow would also commit Portland Fire to the motorized era.  Bungalow's would not accommodate horses or horse drawn apparatus.  It would be another 7 years before all horses were put out to pasture and the department would become fully motorized.  This fire station served as Engine 18 from 1913 to 1933, then was left vacant until 1939 when Engine 18 would again be assigned to it.  That would last until 1941.  It would again sit vacant until 1957, at which time Engine 12 would be assigned there until 1965.  It was then retired for good.  It went into private ownership for a variety of purposes and still remains in existence today.

1914 Sta , Engine 18  Motor.tif
1961 Station 18.tif
2008 July Station 18 old.JPG

203 NE 28th Avenue

(63 E 28th Street)

Engine 12 - 1924 to 1957

Engine 12 - 1907 to 1924

Located on NE 28th Avenue at the corner of Davis Street, Engine 12 began service in 1907.  In 1924, a Bungalow station, designed by Chief Lee Holden, would replace it on the same site.  It would remain in service until 1957 when the Modernization Program would be implemented, creating a number of new stations.  This building no longer exists.

Station 12.jpg
A1, Eng 12, App 19, 1938 Federal.JPG

4828 NE 33rd Avenue

Engine 34 - 1928 to 1959

Located on NE 33rd Avenue between NE Going and Alberta Court, Engine 34 would begin service in 1928.  Station 34 was a Bungalow design, created by Chief Lee Holden.  These station designs were built across the city and proved to be one of the most durable designs to ever serve Portland Fire.  Station 34 would serve until 1959 when the Modernization Program would relocate and redistribute fire stations across the city.  Station 14 would be built on NE 19th and Killingsworth and Engine 34 would go out of service.  This building would be sold into private ownership in 1959 and has served a variety of businesses.  It remains in existence today. 

Station 34.jpg
2008 July Station 34 old.JPG

2 NE 82nd Avenue

(30 E. 82nd Street)

Engine 27 - 1913 to 1953

Located at the corner of NE 82nd Avenue and Burnside Street, Engine 27 would be built and occupied in 1913.  The Two Story design, created by Chief Lee Holden, would be found in many other stations.  Engine 27 would serve at this location until 1953, when the new Station 19 would be built 9 blocks away.  Engine 27 would be moved to the Linnton community.  This building no longer exists.

Station 27 and crew.jpg
Station 27 crew 04.jpg

4835 NE 106th Avenue

Engine 48 - 1984 to 1992

Truck 48 - 1984 to 1985

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on NE 106th Avenue near the corner of NE Sandy Boulevard, Station 48 was inherited from Fire District 10.  The station would house Engine 48 and Truck 48.  With the opening of Fire Station 2 on NE 122nd Avenue, Truck 48 would be moved from this station and become Truck 2 in 1985.  Engine 48 would go out of service in 1992.  The building would be used for various training and auxiliary activities before being sold.  

The building was built in 1935 to serve Parkrose Fire District #2, the first fire district to be recognized in Oregon.  It would eventually merge with Fire District #10.  The building still exists in private ownership.

4800 NE 122nd Avenue

Training Center 

ENGINE 2, TRUCK 2

Engine 2 - 1985 to Present

Truck 2 - 1993 to Present

Station 2 was originally built as the Water Department facility for the Parkrose area.  City of Portland annexations would bring it into the city of Portland's property inventory.  In 1985, it was refitted to serve as a fire station.  Many upgrades took place over the following years as the station was built.  Offices, classrooms, a drill tower, and a variety of training props would populate the grounds .  It eventually became the home of the Training Division for Portland Fire & Rescue.  This includes the training academy.  The station itself was occupied by Engine 2 in 1985 and Truck 2 in 1993.  This is the home for in-service training for firefighters who have completed the Training Academy.  The drill grounds serve all of Portland Fire with a variety of training aids, including a burn building, trench rescue prop, driver training area, and extrication drill areas. The buildings remain in service today. 

A1, Sta 48, 4835 NE 1106th Ave.jpg
2008 July Station 48.JPG
2008 July Station 2 new.JPG

4334 NE 148th Avenue

Engine 28 - 1984 to 1987

Located on NE 148th Avenue near NE Mason Street, Station 28 was constructed as a temporary fire station in 1984 to help fill service voids created by the consolidation with Fire District #10.  It was a manufactured home next to a pole building.  Engine 28 moved from the recently closed station on NE Sandy Boulevard.  The station would be closed and the property sold in 1987.  The building no longer exists.  Engine 28 would be mothballed until 2005 when the station on NE Sandy, in the Hollywood District, would be repurchased and put back in service as Engine 28 due to the closing Station 40. 

B1, Sta 28, 4334 NE 148th Ave.jpg

1520 NE 192nd Avenue

Engine 44 - 1984 to 1987

Truck 44 - 1984 to 1987

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on NE 192nd Avenue at the corner of NE Halsey Street, Station 44 was inherited from Fire District 10.  The station housed Engine 44 and Truck 44.  The station also contained the Fire District 10 drill tower and drill grounds.  The first fire training academy that Portland ever conducted would be held at this location in 1984.  By 1987, the station would be closed and eventually become a part of Gresham Fire Department in 1994 when District 10 would withdraw from the contractual agreement with Portland and sign a new agreement with Gresham Fire Department.  The station remains in existence today.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

A1, Sta 44, 1520 NE 192nd Ave.jpg
2008 July Station 44.JPG
Northwest Portland

NORTHWEST PORTLAND

Foot of NW Couch Street

Hose 1 -1885 to 1892 

Located between NW Couch and Burnside Streets, on what was then Front Avenue, Hose Company #1 had begun service on SW 1st Avenue with Engine 4 in 1883.  It moved to this location in 1885 and stood as a lone company for seven years before moving on to Everett Street and other locations.  The fire station was a wooden two story structure that was never again used after Hose 1 moved out.  The building no longer exists.  

hose 1 house.jpg

245 NW Everett Street

Hose 1 - 1893 to 1897

Located on NW Everett Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, Hose 1 shuffled around NW Portland, having previously been on 1st Avenue, then the Foot of NW Couch Street and later moved to Stark Street.  It was likely always in close proximity to a steamer and would accompany it to fires.  This building no longer exists and no photos of this station are known to exist.

3630 NW Front Avenue

ENGINE 6, FIREBOAT 6

Engine 6 - 1960 to Present

Boat 6 - 1984 to Present

Boat 2 - 1960 to 1984

Located on NW Front Avenue a Block north of NW 26th Avenue, Station 6 was built in 1960 as part of the Modernization Program that would rebuild or relocate stations across the city.  Station 6 would be located adjacent to a lagoon leading to the main channel of the Willamette River to accommodate a fireboat being co-located with a land based crew. Engine 6 and Fireboat 2 would move in together in 1960.  Fireboat 2 would be renamed Fireboat 6 in 1984 when the consolidation with Fire District 10 occurred.  All apparatus within a station would share the same numeric designation.  In the 1980s, the Engine crew would be cut and the remaining crew would be dispatched as either Engine 6 or Fireboat 2.  When responding as one, the other would be put out of service. This station remains in service today. 

A4, Sta 6, 3630 SW Front Ave.jpg
Fireboats Laudenklos and Campbell both 1

10803 NW Front Avenue

Engine 33 - 1921 to 1940

Located on NW Front Avenue (one block east of St. Helens Road) between NW 107th and 112th Avenues, Station 33 would go into service in 1921.  Linnton incorporated as a city in 1910.  They would build their fire station in 1911, with the second floor serving as Linnton City Hall.  Linnton would be annexed into the City of Portland in 1915.  They would also become home for oil companies using large oil storage tanks.  This came as a result of Fire Chief David Campbell's death in the Union Oil Company fire of 1911.  Portland would pass ordinances banning large capacity oil tanks from 5 districts of the city.  Areas to the north, along St. Helens Road, would become the new destination for such facilities.  In 1921, Portland Fire would take over the Linnton Fire Station, assigning Engine 33 to respond from that location.  It would serve until a new fire station would be built on NW 112th Avenue in 1940.  This building no longer exists. 

1920c_Hose 33 in Linnton [new quarters]_
Engine 33 motorized.tif

1425 NW Glisan Street

(511 Glisan Street)

Engine 3 - 1925 to 1968

Truck 3 - 1891 to 1968

Couch Engine Company #6 - 1881 to 1883

Located on NW Glisan Street at NW 14th Avenue, Couch Engine Company #6, the final volunteer company to form, would establish this as their location.  Couch #6 would be deactivated in 1883 when the Portland Paid Fire Department was formed, mothballing this location until Truck 3 was established in 1891.  The fire station would only accommodate one apparatus until it was razed and replaced with a new building in 1913.  Truck 3 would be joined by Engine 3 in 1925.  The station would remain in use until 1968 when the new Station 3 would be built and Engine and Truck 3 would relocate to NW Johnson Street.  The building remains in private ownership today (2024).  

A1, Sta 3, 1425 NW Glisan St.jpg

Foot of NW Hoyt Street

Boat 2 - 1913 to 1923

Located at the foot of NW Hoyt Street, on the edge of the Willamette River, the house of Fireboat 2 would be placed.  No photos of the fire station itself are known to exist.  Fireboat 2, the David Campbell, was commissioned in 1913.  Named for fallen Fire Chief David Campbell, it was one of many efforts to commemorate Chief Campbell, who died in the line of duty on June 26, 1911 at the Union Oil Company fire at SE Salmon Street and Water Avenue.  Fireboat 2 would remain at this location until 1923 when a purpose built fireboat station was built on N. River Road.  The Fireboat David Campbell would be replaced by a newer version in 1927.  It would go on to serve for 95 years before being retired.

A1, D. Campbel.jpg

1715 NW Johnson Street

ENGINE 3, TRUCK 3

Engine 3 - 1968 to Present

Truck 3 - 1968 to Present

Engine 17 - 1968 to 1970 

Located on NW Johnson Street at the corner of NW 17th Avenue, Station 3 would be built in 1968.  It would open with three companies responding from the station: Engine 3, Truck 3, and Engine 17.  Station 17 seven blocks west closed in 1968 and Engine 17 would respond from Station 3 for two years.  It would be mothballed for three years awaiting the opening of a fire station on Hayden Island.  Truck 3 would not need to change its numbering in 1984, being the only Truck Company to match the Engine Company it was housed with prior to 1984.  This station remains in service today. 

B2, Sta 3, 1715 NW Johnson St.jpg
2008 July Station 3 new.JPG

2200 Block NW Nicholi Street

Engine 6 - 1902 to 1924

Located on NW Nicholi Street at NW Sherwood Avenue, Engine 6 began service in 1902 at this location.  This building would remain until 1924 when a bungalow station was built at nearby 2401 NW 23rd Avenue.  This building no longer exists. 

Engine 6 and Hose 6 with crew in front o
Station 6 crew outside.jpg

3130 NW Skyline Boulevard

ENGINE 27

Engine 27 - 2006 to Present

Located on NW Skyline Boulevard north of NW Thompson Road, Station 27 would go into service in 2006.  The hills and roadways of Forest Park pose significant response issues, especially when winter weather strikes.  As development has grown to the North, along Skyline Road, a fire station became necessary.  It is also key to the protection of Forest Park, the largest Park in the United States located within a city boundary.  Forest Park covers 5,200 acres.  By comparison, Central Park in New York covers 840 acres. The station remains in service today.

2008 July Station 27 new.JPG

11212 NW St. Helens Road

Engine 27 - 1960 to 1983

Engine 33 - 1940 to 1960

Located on NW St. Helens Road at the corner of NW 112th Avenue, in Linnton, Station 33 would be relocated from the station a couple blocks away on NW Front Avenue.  The new building would house Engine 33 until 1960.  This is when the Modernization Program would relocate and redistribute fire stations across the city.  Engine 33 would become Engine 27 and continue service until 1983.  At this time, the fire station would be sold into private ownership.  It would serve a variety of private businesses and still exists at that location today, although with a very different facade and appearance. 

1961 Station 27.jpg
2008 July Station 27 older.JPG

5645 NW Willbridge Avenue

Engine 16 - 1986 to 1990

Located on NW Willbridge Avenue, a block west of St. Helens Road and between NW 56th and 57th Avenues, Station 16 replaced the long-ago closed Station 16 at 4465 NW Yeon.  Considered a building of economical design, it was built into the hillside to reduce energy costs and better blend into the Forest Park community.  Within 4 years, Portland Fire decided to abandon it.  The area would be protected by Station 6 on Front Avenue and Station 22 in St. Johns.  The Hazardous Materials Team, who the station was specifically built for, would move to an East County fire station.  The building stayed in city ownership for a few years before being sold.  The building still exists today.

Sta 16, 5645 NW Willbridge Ave.jpg
B1, Haz Mat 16, App 86, 1986 Chevrolet.J

4465 NW Yeon Avenue

Engine 16 - 1944 to 1985

Located on NW Yeon at the intersection of NW Kittridge Avenue and St. Helens Road, Station 16 was built in 1944.  This was another unique design that would not be replicated elsewhere.  Engine 16 carried responsibility for much of the industrial area and would rest in the middle of a very important intersection in NW Portland.  The station would be closed in 1985 and Engine 16 would be mothballed for one year until the new Station 16 would open on NW Willbridge Avenue.  The building would continue unused but under city ownership.  It would become a hazardous waste storage facility in the late 1980s and eventually fall into disarray and be sold to private ownership.  It remains in existence today.

Station 16 Engine 16 App 18 1960 Seagrav
2008 July Station 16 older.JPG

510 NW 3rd Avenue

Engine 2 - 1912 to 1950

Located on NW 3rd Avenue, between NW Glisan and Hoyt Streets, Station 2 was built in 1912.  It was one of the Lee Holden designed Two Story fire stations.  It was one of the more visible Portland Fire stations in the city.  It was occupied by Engine 2 until 1950, when it was supposedly "condemned."  Engine 2 would move south to the new Central Fire Station at Front Avenue and SW Ash Street.  The building remained for many years, occupied for different purposes and finally owned by the Portland Development Commission.  They would have the building demolished in August 2021. 

1913_Station 2 exterior_A2001-083.27.jpg
Station 2 and Engine 2.jpg

1521 NW 20th Avenue

(329 N 20th Street)

Engine 26 - 1915 to 1947

Hose 6 - 1896 to 1912

Located on NW 20th between Quimby and Raleigh Streets, Hose 6 would be established at this location in a two story wooden building.  The station would close in 1912 but remain Portland Fire property.  It would re-open in 1915, occupied by Engine 26.  Engine 26 would serve the area until 1947 when the station was closed for good.  The number 26 would not be used again until 1959 when the fire station on N. Lombard would change from Engine 36 to Engine 26.  This building no longer exists.

Station 26 Engine 26 1913 ALF tall.jpg

2401 NW 23rd Avenue

Engine 6 - 1924 to 1957

Located on NW 23rd Avenue between NW Reed and Nicolai Streets, Station 6 would be built in 1924.  Engine 6 would move from the prior station on NW Nicolai Street to this location.  It was a Bungalow station, designed by Chief Lee Holden.  It would remain in service until 1957 when the Modernization Program would replace and redistribute stations across the city.  Engine 6 would be mothballed for three years before the new Station 6 would open on Front Avenue.  This building still exists today.

Station 6.jpg

824 NW 24th Avenue

(188 N. 24th Street)

Engine 17 - 1913 to 1968

Located on NW 24th Avenue, between NW Johnson and Kearney Streets, Station 17 would begin service in 1913.  It was of the Two Story design, created by Chief Lee Holden.  Engine 17 would provide continuous service at this fire station until Fire Station 3 would open on NW Johnson Street at 17th Avenue in 1968.  The station would be sold into private ownership and has been owned by many people over the years and used as both a residence and business at different times.  The building remains in existence today and has been well cared for over the years.

Station 17 and crew.jpg
1968 Feb 28 Station 17 exterior.tif
South & Southwest Portland

SOUTH & SOUTHWEST PORTLAND

5830 S Kelly Street

(1334 Kelly Street)

Engine 10 - 1925 to 1984

Located on S. Kelly Avenue at the corner of S. Pendleton Street, Station 10 would relocate here from its former location on S. Macadam Avenue.  This was a Bungalow station, designed by Chief Lee Holden.  It would serve continuously until the new Station 10 was built on Taylors Ferry Avenue.  Engine 10 would serve as an only company during the 59 years of service at this location.  The building would be sold into private ownership in 1984 and serve various businesses.  It exists today.

1925 c_Station 10 exterior_A2002-007 wil
A2, Sta 10, 5830 SW Kelly St, 1961 Seagr

5400 S Macadam Avenue

(1250 SW Macadam Road)

Engine 10 - 1906 to 1925

Located on Macadam Avenue between S. Boundary and Sweeney Streets, Engine 10 would begin service in 1906.  The station was a typical two story wooden building that would remain in service until 1925 when the new Station 10 was built a few blocks away on S. Kelly Street.  Note the dirt roads that were common place in this era.  This building no longer exists. 

Station , Engine, Hose 10.tif
Station 10 with Engine 10 and Hose 10 qu

55 SW Ash Street

ENGINE 1, TRUCK 1, SQUAD 1

Engine 1 - 1984 to Present

Engine 21 - 1950 to 1984

Truck 1 - 1950 to Present

Squad 1 - 1962 to Present

Engine 2 - 1950 to 1962

Located on SW Ash Street between SW Naito Parkway (Front Avenue) and First Avenue, the Central Fire Station was built in 1950 to house not only several response companies, but also other administrative operations.  When it opened in 1950, it housed Engine 21 and Truck 1.  Soon after it opened, Station 2, just down the street at 3rd and NW Glisan, was condemned and closed.  Engine 2 moved to Station 1 and for 12 years, the station was staffed with two responding Engine Companies.  In 1962, Engine 2 was de-commissioned and became Squad 1, a specialty rescue unit that remains in service today.  Other apparatus have responded from the station.  They include Rescue 1, the on-duty deputy chief, and fire investigators.  Other apparatus on site have included the Command Unit, the trench rescue unit, dive rescue unit, quick response boats, and various other equipment staffed on an as-needed basis.  The building has also housed many administrative sections of Portland Fire.  This includes the Fire Marshal's Office, Public Education Office, Management Services, Planning and Development, Fire Investigations, and the offices of the Chief and most Division Chiefs.  In fact, at one time the Chief's office was equipped as an apartment where some Chief's would chose to live.  The building was equipped with numerous poles to allow firefighters to move quickly from floor to floor.  From the third floor, poles led to the second floor.  A different pole would be needed to travel from the second floor to the main floor.  The building also boasts a parking garage in the basement.  The building underwent a significant renovation in 2000 to make seismic upgrades, improved sleeping quarters for firefighters, and an overhaul of the offices on the second and third floor.   The building still exists today and includes Engine 1, Truck 1, and Squad 1.

1951 May 6_Central Fire Station_A2001-08
B6, Sta 1, at 55 SW Ash St.JPG
1959-60 Seagraves Engines.jpg
2008 July Station 1 new.JPG

7780 SW Capitol Highway

Engine 18 - 1951 to 1961

Located in Multnomah Village on SW Capital Highway between SW 34th and 35th Avenue, Station 18 began its service in 1939 as Multnomah County Fire District #3.  On February 17, 1938 the Multnomah County Commissioners met at Multnomah School to organize a fire department for Multnomah.  In April 1939 work began on the new fire station building. The building had a dormitory on the second floor, housed equipment on the main, and had a full basement. William (Bill) Surplice was appointed chief May 31, 1939. The Chief enlisted about thirty volunteers, 18 to 28 years of age. They received no compensation, not even on fire calls. The first truck arrived on July 22, 1939.  On November 7 1950, the people of Multnomah voted for annexation into Portland, and Portland took over the fire department on August 1, 1951. The volunteers from the old district who wanted to remain were hired by the Portland Fire Bureau.  The station would operate out of this station until the Modernization Program created a new station on SW 30th Avenue.  Engine 18 would move to its new quarters in 1961.  This building still exists today in private ownership.  

B1, Sta 18, 7780 SW Capitol Hwy.jpg
Engine 18 App 2 1947 ALF with crew in dr

511 SW College Street

ENGINE 4, TRUCK 4

Engine 4 - 1962 to Present

Truck 4 - 1984 to Present

Truck 2 - 1962 to 1984

Located on SW College Street, at the corner of SW 5th Avenue, Station 4 was built in 1964 as part of the Modernization Program.  Engine 4 had been located on SW 4th Avenue, alongside Truck 2, since 1913.  In 1960, Engine 4 would move temporarily to SW 1st Avenue, leaving Truck 2 alone at the station.  In 1962, they would be reunited at the new fire station on College Street.  In 1984, as part of the consolidation with Fire District 10, Truck 2 would be renamed Truck 4, when all numbering of apparatus in a station were matched.  Serving the Portland State District of Portland, Station 4 remains in service today.  

Station 4 Engine 4 App 84 Manifold 4 App
B1, Trk 4, App 69, 1975 Seagrave.JPG

1505 SW DeWitt Street

ENGINE 5

Engine 5 - 1960 to Present

Truck 8 - 1960 to 1984

Located on SW DeWitt Street between SW Cheltenham Street and Sunset Boulevard, Station 5 was built in 1960 as a result of the Modernization Program, which relocated and rebuilt fire stations across the city.  Built to serve the Hillsdale community, Engine 5 would be mothballed for three years between its location on SW Front Street and the opening of this station.  Truck 8 would be co-located with Engine 5, moving from its previous location on SW Montgomery Street.  In 1984, Truck 8 would be eliminated from the workforce.  In the mid 1980s, Engine 5 would be made into a Quad Apparatus.  This is an apparatus with the capabilities of an Engine, but outfitted with additional ladders.  The concept would have it respond with a crew of 6 firefighters and either serve as a Truck Company or Engine Company, whichever was their reason for dispatch.  This concept would be gone by the 1990s and it would revert back to a normal Engine company with a crew of four. This station remains in service today.

1960 Jan 25 Station 5 with apparatus on
B1, Eng 5, App 73, 1985 W.States.JPG

3323 SW Naito Parkway

(811 Front Street)

Engine 5 - 1890 to 1957

Located on what was then Front Avenue between SW Gibbs and Whitaker Streets, Station 5 would be established in 1890.  The first station, a wooden two story would serve until 1924 when a Bungalow, one of Lee Holden's 25 designed stations would replace it.  The Bungalow would go on to serve until 1957 then be removed from the city inventory.  It remains on the site and is in private ownership, having served a variety of commercial businesses over the years. 

1915 Station 5 Engine 5.tif
2008 July Station 5 old.JPG

630 SW Gaines Street

Engine 2 - 1962 to 1985

Located on SW Gaines Street near SW 6th Avenue on the campus of Oregon Health Sciences University, Station 2 would be built in 1962 as part of the Modernization Program.  With intentions of protecting the University, which is located in hilly terrain in SW Portland, Station 2 would be notoriously slow.  In 1985, after the consolidation with Fire District 10 and at a time when operational strategies were being reconsidered, it would be decommissioned and Engine 2 would be mothballed until 1985.  The station used different response strategies, including a reduced crew size and a mini-pumper for maneuverability.  The building was sold to OHSU and remains in existence today. 

A3, Sta 2, 630 SW Gaines St.jpg
Engine 2 Mini Pumper 1977 Dodge Seagrave

1436 SW Montgomery Street

(494 Montgomery Street)

Engine 1 - 1948 to 1963

Truck 8 - 1939 to 1960

Engine 16 - 1911 to 1939

Located on SW Montgomery between SW 14th and 16th Avenues, this station began service in 1911 with Engine 16.  Engine 16 would go out of service in 1939 (later going to the new station on NW Yeon) and Truck 8 would take up residence.  In 1948, Engine 1 would be moved to this station and  it would remain until 1963 when it would be mothballed until 1984.  Truck 8 would remain until 1960 before moving to Hillsdale and being paired with Engine 5.  This building remained owned by the City of Portland and has housed a variety of services.  The building still exists today. 

Station 16 and crew with apparatus.jpg
Sta 1 E-1 1951 Kenworth A-83 & T-1 1939

100 Block of SW Morrison Street

Engine 1 - 1883 to 1891

Willamette Engine Company #1 - 1853 to 1883

Located at SW Morrison Street and 1st Avenue, this station housed Willamette Engine Company #1, the first engine company to serve Portland.  They went into service on August 6, 1853, just days after Vigilance Hook & Ladder was approved by the city fire commission.  In 1867, Willamette would receive the first steam pumper to serve Portland.  No pictures exist of the fire station used from 1853 to 1861.  In 1861, the city of Portland committed $4,000 for the station pictured below.  This station would continue to serve until 1891.  It's not known why the building was taken out of service.  A new station would be built to house Engine and Truck 1 a few blocks away. 

Willamette 1 in front of station 1880 ma

1715 SW Skyline Boulevard

ENGINE 16

Engine 16 - 2003 to Present

Located on SW Skyline Boulevard at the corner of SW Montgomery, Station 16 was built in 2003 to serve the west border of the city of Portland.  Border areas typically present challenges to fire station placement.  Highway 26, a major traffic corridor in and out of the city on the west side, added challenges.  Station 16's response area includes a tunnel that, when blocked, can limit response to the west side of the city.  It also serves significant attractions like the Oregon Zoo, the World Forestry Center, and Washington Park.  The station remains in service today. 

2008 July Station 16 new.JPG

1920 SW Spring Street

(590 SW Spring Street)

ENGINE 15

Engine 15 - 1908 to Present

Located on SW Spring Street between SW 19th and Vista Avenue, Station 15 would be established in 1908.  The original building was quite grand in nature, almost castle-like in appearance.  It would remain until 1925 when it would be replaced by a Bungalow station, one of the Lee Holden designed stations.  Station 15 remains in service today, largely unchanged from its 1925 design. 

Station 15 quarter view and crew.jpg
Station 15.jpg

Foot of SW Stark Street

Hose 1 - 1911 to 1912

Located on the edge of the Willamette River, at the foot of SW Stark Street, this station may have been no more than an existing garage space.  It was used by Hose 1 for one year.  The site was once used as the Stark Street Ferry Landing, which was retired after the Morrison Bridge was completed on April 12, 1887.  This building no longer exists and no photos are known to exist of it.

Station 2 Hose 1.tif

451 SW Taylors Ferry Road

ENGINE 10

Truck 10 - 2014 to Present

Engine 10 - 1984 to 2014

Station 10 was opened in 1984, replacing the old bungalow Station 10 on SW Kelly Street.  It was the second new station to be built since the Modernization program of the early 1960s.  It was controversial, to some extent because it was the first station to incorporate mandatory artwork into its budget and design.  The city of Portland began a program requiring 1% of the building budget to be dedicated to public art.  In the case of Station 10, a stainless steel dragon was created the would wrap around the exterior of the building.  It was met with mixed reviews.  Subsequent stations met the art requirement in different ways.  Most would have interior artwork in public areas.  This station remains in service today. 

B1, Sta 10, 405 SW T. Ferry Rd..jpg

200 Block SW Washington Street

Engine 3 - 1883 to 1884

Columbian Engine Company #3 - 1859 to 1883

Located on SW Washington Street at SW 2nd Avenue, this station serviced Columbian Engine Company #3.  It was the third Engine Company accepted into city service.  Columbian would begin in 1859 and serve until the Portland Paid Fire Department was formed in 1883.  The company and station would transition into Engine 3.  While Columbian would establish their operation in a building at this location, by 1862 they were appealing to the City Council for a new station, calling their current quarters "utterly unfit."  It is unknown exactly when the new quarters would be built, but it would remain at that location until 1884 when Engine 3 would move to a new location farther west on Washington Street. This building no longer exists.

200 Block of SW Washington Street 1883 t

1440 SW Washington Street

(510 Washington Street)

Engine 3 - 1884 to 1925

Located on SW Washington Street and SW 14th Avenue, Engine 3 moved to this location from the 200 Block of SW Washington in 1884.  This would be the first station built under the administration of the Portland Paid Fire Department, which evolved from the Portland Volunteer Fire Department in 1883.  This two story wooden structure boasted 3 apparatus bays.  In the era of horse drawn steam pumpers, every steamer was coupled with a hose company, which was a separate horse drawn wagon.  This station would remain in used until 1925 then not used again.  This building no longer exists.

1233 SW 1st Avenue

(273 1st Street)

Engine 4 - 1960 to 1962

Engine 22 - 1913 to 1960

Chemical 2 - 1894 to 1912

Hose 2 - 1885 to 1912

Engine 4 - 1883 to 1885

Hose 1 - 1883 to 1885

Protection Engine Company #4 - 1862 to 1883

Located on SW 1st Avenue between SW Madison and Jefferson Streets, Protection Engine Company #4 was established at this location.  Protection began service in 1862.  Protection would become Engine 4 in 1883 and remain at this location until 1885, when they would move to a location on 4th Avenue.  Between 1885 and 1912, Hose 2 would occupy the station.  In 1913, Engine 22 would be assigned to the station and remain until 1960.  The station likely received a facelift in 1913, as indicated by the photos below.  Engine 22 would move to St. Johns in 1960 and replace, in number only, the existing Engine 32 located on N. Alta.  This station would be occupied from 1960 to 1962 by Engine 4 while their new quarters were being built on SW College Street.  It was then removed from service.  This building no longer exists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1913 Station 3 with Crew and Engine 3 an
Station 22.tif
Protection Engine Company_pfb.tif
1900 c_Hose 2 living quarters_Kerrigan.j

221 SW 2nd Avenue

(69 2nd Street)

Engine 21 - 1921 to 1950

Truck 1 - 1948 to 1950

Hose 1 - 1898 to 1911

Chemical 1 - 1894 to 1927

Engine 2 - 1883 to 1884

Multnomah Engine Company #2 - 1856 to 1883

​Located on SW 2nd Avenue between SW Pine and Oak Streets, this station began service as Multnomah Engine Company #2 in 1856.  It would transition into the Portland Paid Fire Department in 1883 as Engine 2.  Engine 2 would be moved and replaced with Chemical 1, Hose 1, and finally, in 1921, Engine 21.  Records are not clear but the original building was likely lost in the conflagration of 1873.  The fire destroyed 22 blocks of the city, mostly along 1st and 2nd Avenues.  No photos of the second building on the site are available.  This site would be used 94 years until the Central Fire Station opened in 1950.  The photo on the left shows the station most likely in about 1900.  Chemical Engine 1 is shown in the photo, which served beginning in 1894.  Horses would be gone by 1920.  The photo on the right is 1921 or later, after Engine 21 began service.  The station no longer exists.  

Chemical Engine 1 at Station 2.tif
Station 21 and Engine 21 with crew frame

720 SW 4th Avenue

(170 4th Street)

Engine 1 - 1891 to 1921

Truck 1 - 1883 to 1921

Engine 9 - 1897 to 1898

Vigilance Hook and Ladder #1 - 1853 to 1883

Located on SW 4th Avenue, between Morrison and Yamhill Streets, this station housed the first fire company approved to serve the citizens of Portland.  Records show that Vigilance Hook & Ladder began service on August 2, 1853.  This location would remain in service for 68 years.  While some fire stations were lost in the conflagration of 1873, this building seems to have been spared.  It was rebuilt in 1890 so it could accommodate both an engine and truck company.  While horses were not used by Portland Fire until 1883 (when a budget for horses and firefighters was established), Vigilance Hook & Ladder received a Hayes Second Class ladder truck from the city in 1879.  It was designed for horses.  It is presumed the volunteers might have provided horses for that service.  Prior to that, the crew began in 1853 with a "common wagon," which was hand pulled, to carry ladders.  A purpose-built ladder wagon was built in 1866.  The original building was made of wood.  Later, it would be built of stone or concrete, or with stucco coatings.  This building no longer exists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vigilance Hook & Ladder 1 with crew in f
1915 Truck 1 and crew.tif

905 SW 4th Avenue

(203 4th Street)

Engine 1 - 1921 to 1948

Truck 1 - 1921 to 1948

Located on SW 4th Avenue between SW Salmon and Taylor Streets, Station 1 would be built in 1921.  It would serve as the Central Fire Station until 1948, just before the new Central Fire Station would be built on Front Avenue at Ash Street.  It would close two years before the move, causing Engine 1 and Truck 1, the units assigned to the station, to have to go into temporary service at other stations.  Engine 1 would move to Montgomery Street and Truck 1 would move to SW 2nd Avenue.  This station also served as the administrative headquarters, with Training and the Fire Marshal's Office on the upper floors.  This building no longer exists.

Station 1.jpg
Station 1 and crew 1.jpg

1724 SW 4th Avenue

(370 4th Street)

Engine 4 - 1885 to 1960

Truck 2 - 1888 to 1962

Tiger Engine Company #5 - 1873 to 1883

Located on SW 4th Avenue, between Mill and Montgomery Streets, this station opened as Tiger Engine Company #5.  It was a direct result of the August 2, 1873 conflagration known as "Black Saturday" that destroyed 22 square blocks of the city.  In 1883, when the Portland Paid Fire Department was established, this station was mothballed for 2 years.  It reopened as Engine 4 and was joined by Truck 2 in 1888.  In 1913, a new Two Story building (Lee Holden designed) would occupy the site.  It would remain until 1962 while the new station was built on SW College.  Engine 4 would move into the station on SW College Street in 1960.  Truck 2 would remain as a lone responder here until 1962.  These buildings no longer exists. 

Engine 4 and crew.tif
A3, Sta 4, 370 4th St (1724 SW 4th Ave).

8720 SW 30th Avenue

ENGINE 18

Engine 18 - 1961 to Present

Located on SW 30th Avenue at the corner of SW Dolph Court, Station 18 would be built in 1961 as part of the Modernization Program.  It would replace the fire station on SW Capitol Highway, which was inherited as part of the annexation of Multnomah and the Multnomah Fire Department in 1951.  Engine 18 would serve in this station from the time it opened until today.  It remains in service. 

C2, Sta 18, 8720 SW 30th Ave.jpg
2008 July Station 18 new.JPG
Southeast Portland

SOUTHEAST PORTLAND

2235 SE Bybee Boulevard

ENGINE 20

Engine 20 - 1959 to Present

Located on SE Bybee Boulevard between SE 22nd and 23rd Avenues, Station 20 would be built as a result of the Modernization Program.  Engine 20 would move from its previous location on SE 13th Avenue, where it had existed since 1895, beginning as the Sellwood Volunteer Fire Department.  Portland would begin providing service to the Sellwood community in 1907.  This station remains in service today.

Station 20 Engine 20 App 21 1960 Seagrav
2008 July Station 20 new.JPG

600 SE Cherry Park Road,  Troutdale

Engine 49 - 1984 to 1992

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on SE Cherry Park Road near the corner of Hensley Road in Troutdale, Station 49 was inherited from Fire District 10.  It would be Engine 49 in 1984 until it was taken out of service in 1992, eventually being staffed by Gresham Fire Department after the Fire District #10 contract ended in 1994.  The building remains in existence as a Gresham Fire Station today.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

A1, Sta 49, 1200 SE Cherry Pk.jpg

13310 SE Foster Road

ENGINE 29

Engine 29 - 2006 to Present

Engine 42 - 1984 to 2006

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on SE Foster Road at the corner of SE 134th Avenue, Station 42 was inherited from Fire District 10.  It would maintain its identity as Engine 42 until 2006, when it would be renamed Engine 29.  This was done in an effort to fill in numbering blanks among the Portland fire stations that had occurred over time.  The station remains in service today. No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

A1, Sta 42, 13310 SE Foster Rd.jpg
2008 July Station 29 new.JPG

3350 SE Francis Street

(1000 Francis Avenue)

Engine 25 - 1912 to 1959

Located on SE Francis Street, between 33rd and 34th Avenues, Station 25 was built in 1912.  Similar in design to Station 24, built the year before on N. Interstate Avenue, it is believed to be designed by Chief Lee Holden.  It may have been a headquarters station on the south end of town, explaining the large design of the building.  It would remain in service until 1959, when the Modernization Program would build a new Station 25 on SE Mall Street.  This building remains in existence today, used by the City of Portland to deliver various art programs to the community. 

Station 25 side view with tower.tif
1959 Station 25.tif

11300 SE Fuller Road, Milwaukie

Engine 21 - 1986 to 1991

Clackamas Co. Fire Dist. 1 prior to 1986 and after 1991

Located on SE Fuller Road at the Corner of SE Causey Avenue, this would be inherited from Clackamas County Fire District #1.  Engine 21 would serve the 5 years it was a part of Portland Fire.  The contractual agreement with CCFD #1 would be discontinued in 1991 and the station would be turned back over to CCFD #1.  The building remains in service as a CCFD #1 fire station.

1300 SE Gideon Street

FIRE MARSHAL'S OFFICE

Fire Marshal's Office - 2000 to Present

Located on SE Gideon Street, midway between SE 13th Place and Milwaukie Avenue, this building was purchased around the year 2000 to serve as the Fire Marshal's Office.  The space on the third floor of the Central Fire Station was not large enough to accommodate the FMO staff.  An appealing aspect of this building was that the back side of it was accessed from the property that made up the Portland Fire Logistics Center.  It is also close to Station 23 on SE 13th Place. The building remains in service today.    

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6600 SE Lake Road, Milwaukie

Engine 27 - 1986 to 1991

Clackamas Co. Fire Dist. 1 prior to 1986 and after 1991

Located on SE Lake Road near the intersection with the Milwaukie Expressway (Hwy 224), Station 27 was inherited from Clackamas County Fire District #1.  Engine 27 would serve the 5 years it was a part of Portland Fire.  The contractual agreement with CCFD #1 would be discontinued in 1991 and the station would be turned back over to CCFD #1.  The building remains in service as a CCFD #1 fire station.

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5 SE Madison Street

ENGINE 21, FIREBOAT 21

Engine 21 - 2010 to Present

Fireboat 21 - 2010 to Present

Engine 7 - 1975 to 1990

Fireboat 1 - 1960 to 1982

Engine 29 - 1961 to 1973

Located at the foot of SE Madison Street, along the bank of the Willamette River, This station has held many different identities over the years.  Built in 1960 as part of the Modernization Program, it would begin service as Fireboat 1.  Fireboat 1 was previously docked at the foot of SE Washington Street, just downstream about eight city blocks.  Engine 29 would co-located in the station in 1961, moving from NE Durham Avenue, having been mothballed since 1957.  Fireboat 1 would remain in service there until 1982 when it would be mothballed until 2010, when it would re-emerge as Fireboat 21.  In the meantime, Engine 29 would go out of service in 1973 and be mothballed until 2006 when it would reappear on SE Foster Road when station numbering would be re-organized.  In 1975, the closure of Station 7 on SE Stark Street would find Engine 7 moving into this station and serving as Engine 7 until 1990.  The station was again mothballed, being used for various purposes including the Emergency Medical Services Offices, and other administrative duty.  Engine 7 would re-emerge on SE 122nd Avenue in 2006 when station numbering would be re-organized.  This station would be rebuilt in 2010 with the new designation of Engine 21.  A Fireboat and Rescue Boat would be added, both with the number 21 as a designation.  It remains in service today. 

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5211 SE Mall Street

ENGINE 25, TRUCK 25

Engine 25 - 1959 to Present

Truck 25 - 1984 to Present

Truck 10 - 1959 to 1984

Located on SE Mall Street, at the corner of SE 52nd Avenue, Station 25 would be moved to this location in 1959.  Engine 25 was previously located on SE Francis Street and Truck 10 would be created as a result of the Modernization Program.  The Modernization Program would build or relocate many stations across the city to provide better coverage.  In 1984, Truck 10 would become Truck 25 as part of the consolidation with Fire District 10.  All Truck companies would be renamed to the same number as the Engine company with which they were paired.  This station remains in service today.

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1145 SE Powell Boulevard

(545 SE Powell Boulevard)

LOGISTICS CENTER

Logistics Center - 1975 to Present

Engine 11 - 1907 to 1928

Located on SE Powell Boulevard at the corner of SE Milwaukie Avenue, Engine 11 was located here in 1907.  In 1928, Engine 11 would be moved to the Woodstock neighborhood and later to Lents.  Portland Fire would maintain ownership of the property and operate a drill tower and training operation at the site.  In 1938, a drill tower would be constructed.  In 1975, the Logistics Shop would be built and remains on the site today.  It provides services for apparatus and station maintenance and supply.  Station 23 shares the lot at the northeast corner of the block.  Station 11 no longer exists. 

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1036 SE Stark Street

Engine 7 - 1927 to 1975

Truck 4 - 1927 to 1975

Located on SE Stark Street between SE 10th and 11th Avenue, Station 7 would be built in 1927.  This station used a unique design not shared by any other Portland Fire Stations.  Engine 7 and Truck 4 would both be housed here, with Engine 7 and Truck 4 having previously served on SE 3rd Avenue.  This station would remain open until 1975.  At that time, Engine 7 would replace Engine 29 at the foot of SE Madison Street, on the bank of the Willamette and Truck 4 would be co-located with Engine 23 on SE 13th Place.  During its term of service, Station 7 would also house a Battalion Chief and the Auto Shop.  The Auto Shop would provide all maintenance services for fire bureau vehicles.  The new Apparatus Maintenance Facility would open in 1975 at the corner of SE Milwaukie Avenue and Powell Boulevard, across the block from Station 23.  This building was sold to private ownership in 1975 and served a variety of businesses.  It was refurbished back to somewhat original condition in the early 2000's and remains in existence today. 

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6049 SE Stark Street

(1599 SE Stark Street)

Engine 19 - 1911 to 1953

Located on SE Stark Street between SE 60th and 61st Avenues, this 1911 building was likely the last wooden building constructed by Portland Fire.  From this point forward, all buildings were brick, stone, or stucco covered.  This may have been part of a fire-resistant design strategy to prevent damage in the event of a major conflagration.  Engine 19 would be assigned here from its opening in 1911 until it closed in 1953.  The new Station 19 would be built on East Burnside that year.  The building still exists today in private ownership.

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549 SE Water Avenue

(Foot of E Washington Street)

Fireboat 1 - 1905 to 1960

Located on the East bank of the Willamette River, Fireboat 1 was the location of the first Fireboat to serve Portland.  The George Williams (named for the Portland Mayor who served from 1902 to 1905) was commissioned in 1904.  It was powered by steam and stretched 105 feet, 6 inches in length.  It would remain in service until 1927.  This building no longer exists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

302 SE 3rd Avenue

(40 E 3rd Avenue)

Engine 7 - 1891 to 1927

Truck 4 - 1907 to 1927

Located on SE 3rd Avenue at Pine Street, this station began service with Portland in 1891.  It may have been pre-existing and come to Portland during the 1891 annexation of East Portland.  It would serve as quarters for Engine 7 beginning in 1891 with Truck 4 co-locating in 1907.  The two companies would remain until 1927 when  the new Station 7 would open on SE Stark Street. After 1927, the building would be removed from city inventory.  It no longer exists. 

  

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1917 SE 7th Avenue

(367 E 7th Avenue)

Engine 23 - 1913 to 1962

Hose 3 - 1891 to 1912

Located on SE 7th Avenue between SE Stephens and Harrison Streets, Station 23 began life as Hose Company #3.  It likely came to Portland when East Portland was annexed into the city in 1891.  It would be re-built to its current design in 1912.  This was a standard Two Story design, one of the 25 stations designed by Lee Holden.  At one time, the homes adjacent to it on 7th Avenue were called "firefighters row."  That was a row of private houses owned by the firefighters who worked there.  This was said to be a larger number of homes than most stations, but the concept was not uncommon.  In the days before affordable automobiles, people typically lived near their work.  Firefighting was not a high paying job so many firefighters lived near or even in the fire station.  Station 23 would close in 1962 when the new Station was built SE 13th Place.  This building still exists, in private ownership.  

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2915 SE 13th Place

ENGINE 23

Engine 23 - 1962 to 2010 and 2017 to Present

Truck 23 - 1984 to 1985

Truck 4 - 1975 to 1984

Located on SE 13th Place between SE Powell Boulevard and Gideon Street, Station 23 would be built as part of the Modernization Program.  Engine 23 would move from its previous location on SE 7th Avenue to this station in 1962.  It would respond as a single company until the closure of Station 7 on SE Stark Street, when the Engine 7 would go to the foot of SE Madison and Truck 4 would join Engine 23 in 1975.  In 1984, Truck 4 would become Truck 23 when the consolidation of Fire District 10 would change all apparatus numbers to match within each fire station.  From 1975 to 1985, Station 23 would serve as an in-service training company, a place where new hires would be trained as firefighters.  The last crew to receive training here would graduate in 1985.  Soon after, Truck 23 would be taken out of service and mothballed until 1993 when a truck company would be added to Station 2 (the new training station in 1985).  All training would begin with an academy followed by in service training at this facility on NE 122nd Avenue.  In 2010, Engine 23 would be taken out of service.  It was deemed unnecessary due to the re-opening of Station 21 at the foot of SE Madison Street.  Pressure from the community and the Portland Firefighters Association would re-activate Station 23 in 2017.  It was operated with a rescue unit only for a period of time before being fully restored as a four person Engine Company.  It remains in service today. 

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8210 SE 13th Avenue

(1660 E 13th Street)

Engine 20 - 1910 to 1959

Hose 4 - 1907 to 1909

Sellwood Volunteers - 1895 to 1907

Located on SE 13th Avenue between Umatilla and Tenino Streets, Station 20 began service to the Sellwood community in 1895, prior to being a part of the Portland Paid Fire Department.  The Sellwood volunteers would join the department in 1907 and their station would house Hose Company #4 from 1907 to 1910.  In 1910, Engine 20 would join Hose 4 and become Engine 20.  The original fire station would be razed in 1921 and a Bungalow station would be built.  This was one of the 25 stations designed by Lee Holden.  The station would remain in service until 1959 when the station on SE Bybee Street would open.  Once closed, it was sold then occupied by the Boys & Girls Club for many decades.  In 1990, the building was purchased by the Sellwood Moreland Improvement League neighborhood association (SMILE).  The building remains standing in private ownership.

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1000 SE 34th Avenue

(180 E 34th Avenue)

Hose 5 - 1894 to 1897

Located on SE 34th Avenue at the corner of Yamhill Street, Hose 5 came into service as the Belmont District began to form.  It was on the outskirts of Portland at that time.  It may have originally been a volunteer station for the Belmont community as it was developing in the 1890s.  The building would cease to be used in 1897 when the station on SE 35th would be built.  This building no longer exists.  No photos of it are known to exist. 

900 SE 35th Avenue

(162 E. 35th Street)

HISTORIC BELMONT FIREHOUSE

Safety Learning Center and Fire Museum - 2003 to Present

Engine 9 - 1912 to 2003

Truck 6 - 1928 to 1963

Engine 9 - 1904 to 1912

Hose 5 - 1897 to 1904

Located on SE 35th Avenue at the corner of Belmont Street, this station replaced Hose 5 at 34th and Yamhill in 1897.  In 1904, Engine 9 would be established at the site and Hose 5 would become Hose 9.  Originally a wooden, two-story structure, it would be replaced with a Lee Holden designed Two-Story in 1912.  The station would be joined by Truck 6 in 1928.  In 1963, Truck 6 would move to Station 19 but Engine 9 would remain and serve continuously until 2003, when the new station would be built on SE Cesar Chavez Boulevard (39th Avenue).  The building would then be converted into what became known as the "Historic Belmont Firehouse."  It would house the Safety Learning Center & Fire Museum.  This was designed as an interpretive center for the history and heritage of Portland Fire.  It was also a fire and life safety learning destination to bring efficiencies to educating the public about fire and injury prevention.  It remains in service at the same site where it was established in 1897.  

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1706 SE Cesar Chavez Boulevard

(1706 SE 39th Avenue)

ENGINE 9

Engine 9 - 2003 to Present

Located on SE Cesar Chavez Boulevard near the intersection of SE Market Street, Station 9 was built in 2003 as a replacement for the fire station on SE Belmont Street.  Station 9 continues the tradition of service in the Belmont/Hawthorne community that started in 1894 at SE 34th and Yamhill.  The station remains in service today.

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5905 SE 43rd Avenue

Engine 11 - 1928 to 1956

Located on SE 43rd Avenue between SE Woodstock Boulevard and Knight Street, Station 11 was relocated from SE Powell Boulevard in 1928.  Engine 11 would serve at this location until 1956 when it would be mothballed until 1960 and come back to replace Engine 35 in the Lents community on SE 92nd Avenue.  This fire station would be sold into private ownership in 1956 and today, serves as a community center for the Woodstock community.  The building remains in existence today. 

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4530 SE 67th Avenue

Portland Firefighters Association - 1986 to Present

Engine 31 - 1913 to 1959

Located on SE 67th Avenue between Pardee Street and Holgate Boulevard, Station 31 began service in 1913.  The original building was a two-story wooden structure that would be replaced in 1927.  The new building was a Bungalow station, designed by Chief Lee Holden.  It would remain in service until 1959 when the Modernization Program would build and redistribute fire stations across the city.  The new Station 25 would be built on SE 52nd Avenue, replacing the need for this station.  It was sold into private ownership and would be purchased in 1986 by the Portland Firefighters Association to serve as their Union Headquarters.  While remaining the owners, the  PFFA now leases the building for other business use.  The building remains in existence today.

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5707 SE 92nd Avenue

ENGINE 11

Engine 11 - 1960 to Present

Engine 35 - 1946 to 1960

Engine 37 - 1928 to 1946

Located on SE 92nd Avenue at the corner of SE Reedway Street, Station 37 would be built in 1928 to serve the Lents Community.  Lents had previously been served by a volunteer fire department that began in 1919.  The city of Portland, when approached, agreed to fund a building if the Lents Firefighter would provide a building lot.  They did.  It was located at SE 58th Avenue and Ramona Street.  In 1928, Lents would get their own Portland Fire Station and crew.  It would begin service as Engine 37, who would serve until 1946.  It would be reassigned as Engine 35 from 1946 until 1960.  The Modernization Program would relocate and redistribute fire stations across the city and this station would again be re-designated as Engine 11, which remains today.  The station is a Bungalow design, created by Chief Lee Holden.  It has undergone numerous renovations over the years, including a major seismic and design renovation in the early 2000's.  It remains in service with Portland Fire today.  

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1500 SE 122nd Avenue

ENGINE 7, TRUCK 7

Engine 7 - 2006 to Present

Truck 7 - 2006 to Present

Engine 41 - 1984 to 2006

Truck 41 - 1984 to 2006

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on SE 122nd Avenue at the corner of SE Madison Street, Station 41 would be inherited from Fire District 10.  It housed Engine 41 and Truck 41 in 1984 when Portland and District 10 combined.  In the 1990s, this station would become the home for the Hazardous Materials Team, which had previously operated between Station 7 (SE Madison) and Station 16 (NW Willbridge).  Both Engine 41 and Truck 41 would remain in continuous service, but both would be renumbered in 2006 to Engine 7 and Truck 7.  This was prompted by an effort to fill in blank station numbers that had occurred over time within Portland’s numbering system.  The station remains in service today. No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

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1927 SE 174th Avenue

ENGINE 31

Engine 31 -2007 to Present

Co-Staffing with Gresham Fire Dept.

Engine 45 - 1984 to 2007

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on SE 174th Avenue between SE Stephens and Grant Streets, Station 45 was inherited from Fire District 10.  It would be designated Engine 45 in 1984 and remain as such until 2007 when it was renamed Engine 31 as part of the renumbering to fill in the gaps in Portland’s numbering system.  The city boundary with Gresham is 174th Avenue in that part of Portland.  It was determined that 1/3 of Engine 31’s calls for service were into the city of Gresham.  A collaborative agreement was formed between Portland and Gresham Fire to staff one shift with Gresham Firefighters and two shifts with Portland Firefighters.  This was intended to represent cost sharing while eliminating the need for one or both fire departments to relocate fire stations to serve their own areas.  Engine 31 maintains its identity no matter the department for which it responds.  The building remains in service today.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

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645 SE 223rd Avenue, Gresham

Engine 46 - 1984 to 1986

District 10 prior to 1984

 

Located on SE 223rd Avenue near the corner of SE Stark Street, Station 46 served an area called twelve-mile corner.  Station 46 was inherited from Fire District 10.  It would serve as Engine 46 from 1984 to 1986, when it would go out of service.  The building no longer exists.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.

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7144 SE 302nd Avenue, Gresham

Engine 47 - 1984 to 1984

District 10 prior to 1984

Located on SE 302nd Avenue near the corner of SE Dodge Park Boulevard, Station 47 was inherited from Fire District 10.  It would house Engine 47 for less than a year when it would close and become a part of Gresham Fire Department due to annexations in the area.  The building remains in existence today, although not as a fire station.  No information on the origins of the building (prior to 1984) is available.  

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PF&R Heritge Sites

PF&R HERITAGE SITES

Portland boasts several fire heritage sites, each with a unique and historic story.  These sites are described below.  A brief summary of each site is provided here but explore this site for more information on each. 

David Campbell Memorial & 

Portland Firefighter Memorial Plaza

1928 to Present

David Campbell was Chief of the Portland Fire Department from 1895 to 1896.  He was removed from his position due to political differences with the mayor.  The following year, in 1896, a new administration was installed at city hall and Campbell was again promoted to Chief.  He served continuously until his line of duty death on June 26, 1911.  He was 47 years old.  Campbell was very popular with the rank and file and with the citizens of Portland.  His death rocked the city and his funeral procession was said to be the largest in the history of the city of Portland.  While he was not the first Portland Firefighter to die in the line of duty, his death inspired a memorial to firefighters who would die in the line of duty.  It would take 17 years, but on June 28, 1928, the memorial was unveiled to the citizens of Portland.  It consists of a stone terrace and a limestone cenotaph on which a bronze bas-relief of Chief Campbell is displayed.  The bas-relief shows Campbell in his uniform and holding his Chief's helmet in his hand.  The sculpture was done by Avard Tennyson Fairbanks in 1927.  He was the professor of sculpture at the University of Oregon.  It is mounted on a stone slab above a fountain and pool.  These features were designed by Paul Cret, a world renowned architect recommended by an ex-student who was a Portland architect.  A legend is mounted above the fountain stating "Erected by many friends in honor of David Campbell, Chief of the Portland Fire Department 1895 to 1911, who lost his life in the performance of his duty June 26, 1911.  Greater Love Hath No Man Than This."  It cost $35,000 to build, all coming from private donations. 

 

A triangular space located at 1864 SW Alder Street contains the "David Campbell Memorial" and the Portland Firefighter Memorial Plaza.    In 1963, the Portland Junior Chamber of Commerce, with the assistance of the Oregon chapter of the American Institute of Architects and local businesses and labor unions, lobbied the city to create a strip of park along the east side of the David Campbell Memorial monument. The work of narrowing 18th Avenue was completed the next year and succeeded in providing a small amount of open space adjacent to the monument as it became choked by ever-increasing traffic.  The space was named Portland Firefighters Park but today is the Portland Firefighter Memorial Plaza and David Campbell Memorial.  The triangle boasts the Messenger Bell, which once hung in the bell tower of Station 1.  It was purchased after "Black Saturday," the Portland fire of August 2, 1873 which leveled 22 square blocks of the city.  The bell weighs 4,200 pounds, 800 of which are pure silver.  When rung, it could be heard all the way to Oregon City, 13 miles away.  Not long after the bell arrived, a fire alarm telegraph system would begin to cover the city, rendering the bell nearly obsolete before it ever saw significant use.

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Firefighter's Section - Lone Fir Cemetery

1862 to Present

 

Lone Fir Cemetary was established in the early 1850s on the farthest NE corner of Colburn Barrell's farm land.  It was set aside at the request of the original land settler, James B. Stephens.  His deal with Barrell was that his parents would be buried there.  The site would eventually become Lone Fir Cemetery.  

On November 16, 1862, Colburn Barrell donated Block 5, a 100 foot by 100 foot section of the cemetery, for exclusive use of Portland Firefighters.  History does not tell us why he made this generous gesture, his name does not show up on any volunteer rosters, and his gift was well before the first known firefighter line of duty death.  

The first burial would occur in 1864.  Since that time, and as of January 1, 2021, 142 burials have occurred in the Firefigher's Section.  It includes 137 Portland Fire personnel, 4 spouses of members, and one child of a member.  In all, twelve members who died in the line of duty rest in the Firefighter's Section.  Also, the first firefighter (James Reed) known in Oregon to have died in the line of duty is interred there.   

Lone Fir Cemetery, as a whole, has received varying levels of care over the decades.  The Firefighter's Section has also had its ups and downs.  It was somewhat forgotten after World War II because so many dying firefighters chose Willamette National Cemetery, due to their military service.  Since the regional government organization Metro took over the cemetery administration, Lone Fir, overall, has received better care.  the Portland Firefighters Association has since stepped up to better caretake the Firefighter's Section.  It is a beautiful location inside the 30.5 acres of the overall cemetery.  

To find the Firefighter's Section, enter Lone Fir Cemetery on the east side roadway coming from 601 SE 26th Avenue.  Follow the main road west until it ends, then turn right.  The next intersection will find the Firefighter's Section on the right.  It can be identified by the flagpole and garden at it's center.  In the garden is a sign identifying the site.  Block markers will indicate Block 5.  

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Historic Belmont Firehouse

Safety Learning Center & Fire Museum

2003 to Present

The Historic Belmont Firehouse was shared as former Engine 9.  In 2003, the station would be vacated when the new Station 9 was completed.  This opened the door for its development as a Safety Learning Center (SLC) and Fire Museum (FM).  

The SLC was developed as an efficient means of conveying fire and life safety information and education to the public.  Using the backdrop of a 1912 fire station allowed the facility to exist in an interesting and unique setting.  The historic artifacts, stories, images, and the station itself were used to create timelines of Portland Fire History.  Tools and equipment that have been used by Portland Firefighters since 1853 are on display.  These are the tools and technology that exist to provide for citizen safety, so each has a message to the public.  Images are framed in ladders that make timelines of how equipment and members have evolved over the decades.  The station itself, which was built in the horse-drawn era, retains features of the original building alongside the upgrades necessary to keep it operational up to the 21st century.  

While the building is filled with historic materials, it was not developed to be a "museum."  Every element within the building is designed as a teaching adjunct, yet it can be entertaining as a trip back in time, making the facility very versitile.  The developer of the facility touts it as "the greatest fire and life safety teaching tool I ever had."  

The Historic Belmont Fireshouse can be found at the corner of SE 35th Avenue and Belmont Street in the Belmont Business District.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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